A Dickens of a Christmas; The Twelve Ghosts of Christmas 2

Charles Dickens, beloved author of that famous Christmas ghost story, A Christmas Carol, may himself be a ghost

Charles Dickens, beloved author of that famous Christmas ghost story, A Christmas Carol, may himself be a ghost

Of course the most famous Christmas ghost story is Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, and that has become a beloved classic. If Dickens had never written another word, he would be famous for that alone.

Ironically, however, there is a strong possibility that Dickens himself is a Christmas ghost. How and why he may be is a curious tale unto itself.  Five days after his death, he appeared at a séance in America and the old boy’s shade has been reappearing ever since.

Charles Dickens, despite his fame, desired a quiet funeral in his native city of Rochester (England, not New York). However, his adoring public would have none of it; like all great British writers, it was demanded he be buried in Westminster Abbey with great pomp and ceremony. So with all the ornate and elaborate ritual as befitted a Victorian funeral, Charles Dickens’s body was entombed in the great English cathedral. But despite the funeral, Dickens was not laid to rest.

It is said that at Christmastime, the shade of the great author returns to his home in Rochester and walks again amongst the living, like old Marley in his famous tale. People passing by the former home have sworn to have seen a ghostly gent dressed in antique dress walking past it.

Like Marley's ghost haunting Scrooge, Dickens ghost is said to haunt the streets of Rochester England.

Like Marley’s ghost haunting Scrooge, Dickens ghost is said to haunt the streets of Rochester England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Believe it or not; either way, have a Dickens of a Christmas season!

 

Ghosts and Haunts of Tennessee

Ghosts and Haunts of Tennessee

 

For more true ghost stories see: Strange Tales of the Dark and Bloody Ground, Dixie Spirits and Ghosts and Haunts of Tennessee, my lasted and spookiest offering.

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